Volume 17, Issue 6 p. 959-968
FEATURED ARTICLE

Actigraphic sleep patterns and cognitive decline in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

Christian Agudelo

Christian Agudelo

Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA

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Wassim Tarraf

Wassim Tarraf

Department of Healthcare Sciences and Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA

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Benson Wu

Benson Wu

Department of Neurosciences and Shiley-Marcos Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California, USA

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Douglas M. Wallace

Douglas M. Wallace

Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA

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Sanjay R. Patel

Sanjay R. Patel

Center for Sleep and Cardiovascular Outcomes Research, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

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Susan Redline

Susan Redline

Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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Sonya Kaur

Sonya Kaur

Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA

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Martha Daviglus

Martha Daviglus

Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA

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Phyllis C. Zee

Phyllis C. Zee

Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA

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Guido Simonelli

Guido Simonelli

Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal, CIUSSS du Nord-de-l'Ile-de-Montréal, Montréal, Canada

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Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani

Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA

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Daniela Sotres-Alvarez

Daniela Sotres-Alvarez

Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

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Donglin Zeng

Donglin Zeng

Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

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Linda C. Gallo

Linda C. Gallo

Department of Psychology and South Bay Latino Research Center, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, USA

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Hector M González

Hector M González

Department of Neurosciences and Shiley-Marcos Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California, USA

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Alberto R. Ramos

Corresponding Author

Alberto R. Ramos

Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA

Correspondence

Alberto Ramos, Department of Neurology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1120 NW 14th Street, Suite 1350, Miami, FL 33136, USA.

E-mail: [email protected]

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First published: 22 December 2020
Citations: 6

Abstract

Introduction

We determined if actigraphy-derived sleep patterns led to 7-year cognitive decline in middle-aged to older Hispanic/Latino adults.

Methods

We examined 1035 adults, 45 to 64 years of age, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Participants had repeated measures of cognitive function 7 years apart, home sleep apnea studies, and 1 week of actigraphy. Survey linear regression evaluated prospective associations between sleep and cognitive change, adjusting for main covariates.

Results

Longer sleep-onset latency was associated with declines in global cognitive function, verbal learning, and verbal memory. Longer sleep-onset latency was also cross-sectionally associated with verbal learning, verbal memory, and word fluency. Sleep fragmentation was not associated with cognitive change.

Conclusion

In a cohort of mostly middle-aged Hispanic/Latinos, actigraphy-derived sleep-onset latency predicted 7-year cognitive change. These findings may serve as targets for sleep interventions of cognitive decline.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

The authors report no conflicts of interest.