Volume 16, Issue 10 p. 1393-1401
FEATURED ARTICLE

Vitamin D intake is associated with dementia risk in the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP)

Chen Zhao

Chen Zhao

Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA

Department of Neurology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, 17033

Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, 17033

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Angeliki Tsapanou

Angeliki Tsapanou

Taub Institute for Research of Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

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Jennifer Manly

Jennifer Manly

Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA

Taub Institute for Research of Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

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Nicole Schupf

Nicole Schupf

Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA

Taub Institute for Research of Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

Department of Epidemiology, Joseph P. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

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Adam M. Brickman

Adam M. Brickman

Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA

Taub Institute for Research of Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

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Yian Gu

Corresponding Author

Yian Gu

Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA

Taub Institute for Research of Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

Department of Epidemiology, Joseph P. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

Correspondence

Yian Gu, Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 622 W. 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA.

E-mail: [email protected]

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First published: 13 September 2020
Citations: 16

Abstract

Introduction

Low vitamin D intake and low vitamin D circulating levels have been associated with increased risk for dementia. We aimed to examine the association between vitamin D intake and dementia in a multiethnic cohort.

Methods

A longitudinal study of 1759 non-demented older (≥65 years) participants of the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project with follow-up visits and completed a food frequency questionnaire. Dementia was diagnosed by consensus using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. Cox hazard regression was performed.

Results

During a mean follow-up of 5.8 years, 329 participants developed dementia. Participants with the highest tertile of vitamin D intake from food sources had decreased risk (hazard ratio [HR] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54–0.97, P = .030) for dementia compared with those with the lowest tertile, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, apolipoprotein E (APOE)-ε4, physical activity, Mediterranean diet (MeDI) score, income, depression, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and smoking.

Discussion

Higher vitamin D intake is associated with decreased risk of dementia in a multiethnic cohort.